Pioneer Plant-Tech, Inc.
Hops Vista.jpg

Available Hops Varieties

This page describes the varieties of clean, disease-free hops plants available for sale to customers in New York State and the Northeast, as well as Ontario, Quebec, and other Canadian provinces.  

Hops Vista.jpg

Available Hops

We are currently offering the varieties listed below, and are continuing to develop our collection of stock plants through special orders from the National Clean Plant Network.  If you're looking for a strain of hops that is not represented below, please contact us and we'll investigate the availability of certified stock for purposes of propagating the quantity you need.  

The varietal information detailed below has been aggregated from sources ranging from our own experience as well as the United States Department of Agriculture Hop Cultivar Descriptions, the Hop Growers of America/USAHops 2016 Variety Manual, the Michigan State University Integrated Pest Management Hop Descriptions, input from academic and industry contacts, and several helpful brewers' reference websites (most notably BeerLegends.com and MoreBeer.com).  


AlphAroma (Rakau)

A New Zealand variety capable of serving as either an aroma or bittering hop, AlphAroma is difficult to find in the U.S. but can offer growers high-end yields.  It is considered a 'Super Alpha' hop, and is growing in popularity.  

  • Aromas:  Tropical fruit, passionfruit, peach
  • Used In: Pale ales, lagers, IPAs
  • Yield (max lbs/acre):  1100-3400 (USDA six-year average = 2330)
  • Alpha Acids: 5.8-10.9%
  • Beta Acids:  2.4-4.8%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  27%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce):  .98-1.52 ml
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  72%
  • Disease Resistance: Moderately resistant to downey mildew, thought to be resistant to verticillium wilt
  • Harvest maturity:  Late to very late
  • Comparables:  CTZ (Columbus, Tomahawk, Zeus)
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes:  Large rangy grower that needs space. Plant habit is clavate- the sidearms increase in length towards the top of the bine; similar to many other NZ types. Sidearm length 24-48” or more. Recommend cluster-style planting or 48”in-row spacing.
  • Recommended Resources:  USDA Cultivar Description, Beer Legends Profile

Bramling

Historically a major English variety, now less commercially utilized.  

  • Used In: Ales, pilseners
  • Yield (max lbs/acre): 600-1000
  • Alpha Acids: 5.8%
  • Beta Acids:  3.0%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  27%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce):  .9 ml
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  76%
  • Disease Resistance: Moderately susceptible to downey mildew
  • Harvest Maturity:  Early
  • Recommended Resources:   USDA Cultivar Description

Cascade

The darling of the craft brew community and most widely grown U.S. variety, Cascade is an aromatic hop with citrus, grapefruit, and floral notes balanced with bittering potential.  It provides the signature aroma profile for many American Ales.  

  • Aromas:  Floral, spicy, citrus, grapefruit
  • Used In:  Pale ales, IPAs, porters
  • Yield (max lbs/acre): 1600-2000
  • Alpha Acids:  4.5-7.0% 
  • Beta Acids:  4.8-7.0%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  33-40%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce):  0.7-1.4 ml
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  48-52%
  • Disease Resistance: Moderately resistant to downy mildew and verticillium wilt
  • Harvest maturity:  Medium to medium-late
  • Comparables:  Centennial, Amarillo, Columbus
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes: The compact medium sized cone has a square shoulder shape and has a moderate amount of light yellow lupulin that develops in unique tight balls in the cone. It has 24-30” sidearms and is good for picking, drying and baling. Will grow in hot areas and tolerates alkaline soils. . . .Craft brewers and growers "workhorse hop."  Notably finer hop bines – more bines with a smaller diameter, creates a lot of late season growth near ground, which can harbor mites. Shows notable resistance to mildews. Raised rows recommended. 36” in-row spacing. 
  • Recommended Resources:  USDA Cultivar Description, Beer Legends Profile

Cashmere

Developed by Washington State University and released commercially in 2013, Cashmere has made an immediate industry impact, including a mention by DRAFT Magazine as one of "3 Hop Varieties You Need To Know" and as one of the "Hops to Watch in 2017" by All About Beer Magazine.  It is a cross between Cascade and Northern Brewer that is typically considered a dual purpose hop given its combination of significant alpha acid content and pleasing aromatics. Cashmere contains no farnescene and twice as much humulene as Cascade (as well as higher alpha acids).

  • Aromas:  Melon, tangerine, pineapple, coconut, spicy
  • Used In:  IPAs, APAs, Ales
  • Yield (max lbs/acre):  Unknown/anecdotally above average
  • Alpha Acids:  7.7%-9.1%
  • Beta Acids:  3.3%-7.1%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  22%-24%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce):  1.2-1.4 ml
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  75% 
  • Disease Resistance:  Unknown/anecdotally moderate resistance to downy
  • Harvest maturity:  Medium to medium-late
  • Comparables:  Cascade
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes: NONE
  • Recommended Resources:  Hopslist, USA Hops Electronic Variety Manual

Centennial

A widely popular aromatic variety with citrus and floral notes as well as bittering aspects.  It is sometimes referenced as 'Super Cascade,' but is lighter on the citrus aromas.  It was released by the USDA in 1974 and has had usage peaks and valleys in the time since, but is currently one of the more heavily utilized cultivars.  

  • Aromas:  Medium intense, floral, citrus
  • Used In: IPAs, pale ales
  • Yield (max lbs/acre): 1500-1750
  • Alpha Acids:  9.5%-11.5%
  • Beta Acids:  3.5%-4.5%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  29-30%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce):  1.5-2.5 ml
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  60-65%
  • Disease Resistance: Moderate to low resistance to downy mildew.  Resistance to verticillium wilt unknown but thought to be tolerant.
  • Harvest Maturity:  Early to medium-early
  • Comparables:  Cascade, Columbus, Chinook, Comet
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes:  It has a dense compact cone that is medium in size; with shorter 12-30” side arms. It has good pickability, drying and baling characteristics. It also has an abundant amount of lupulin that is dark yellow in color. Also used in landscapes because of its dark green foliage and habit. . . .Breaks dormancy early, evenly & well. Bines emerge from crown more horizontally, a good climber after training, lots of similar sized bines from crown. Centennial is fussier about heavy soil types and drainage; does poorly if over-watered. It will tolerate more alkaline soils and water sources. Requires more labor than most to train and shows low resistance to downy mildew. Raised rows required except in very sandy soils. 36” in-row spacing.
  • Recommended Resources:  USDA Cultivar Description, Beer Legends Profile 

Chinook

Released by the USDA in 1985, Chinook is a popular dual purpose hop which imparts a smooth bitterness and interesting aroma profile.  A robust grower that appears to fare well in the northeast.  

  • Aromas:  Medium intense, pine, citrus, grapefruit
  • Used In:  Pale ales, IPAs, stouts, lagers, and more
  • Yield (max lbs/acre): 1600-2200
  • Alpha Acids:  12-14%
  • Beta Acids:  3-4%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils): 29-34%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce):  1.5-2.7
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  68-70%
  • Disease Resistance:  Moderately resistant to downy mildew
  • Harvest Maturity:  Medium to late medium
  • Comparables:  Northern Brewer, CTZ, Centennial, Galena, Nugget
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes:  "Super alpha hybrid with high vigor & yield. A Peltham Golding X 63012M cross. (The German hop “Perle” shares the Peltham Golding parentage). . . .Slower to emerge from dormancy. It is the variety all other hops in the Midwest are compared to for vigor and yield. Chinook forms large primary bines and climbs well with consistent yields. Shows better resistance to mildews and pests than most varieties. Notably forgiving of soil types, drainage, and less-than-perfect growing conditions. 42” in-row spacing.
  • Recommended Resources:  USDA Cultivar Description, Beer Legends, USA Hops Electronic Variety Manual

Comet

Comet was released by the USDA in 1974 to meet the need for a higher alpha-acid producing hop, but usage has declined a bit in the time since due to the variety of high-alpha hops now available.  However, there seems to be a recent resurgence in interest.  It is a cross between English Sunshine and a native North American variety. Comet’s storage stability is very good and has a pungent, "wild American aroma" with a strong grapefruit aroma.

  • Aromas:  Citrus/grapefruit
  • Used In:  American Ales, IPAs, Lagers, Sour & Lambic styles
  • Yield (max lbs/acre): 1700-2000
  • Alpha Acids:  9.4%-12.4%
  • Beta Acids:  4.6%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  41%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce):  1.98 ml
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  49%
  • Disease Resistance:  Some resources report susceptible to downy mildew, some say resistant: bet on average. Resistant to verticilium wilt.
  • Harvest Maturity:  Medium-late
  • Comparables:  Galena, Brewer's Gold 
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes:  Vigorous grower, medium-sized elongated cones, average resistance to mildews and pests. 36-40” in-row spacing. 24-40” sidearms.  
  • Recommended Resources: USDA Cultivar Description, USA Hops Electronic Variety Manual, BSG Hops Sell Sheet

Crystal

A mild aromatic variety with floral and spicy aromas, Crystal is growing in popularity for its applications in a broad range of beers and boasts excellent resistance to downy mildew.

  • Aromas:  Mild, spicy, floral
  • Used In: Light ales, aroma for IPAs, stouts and lagers
  • Yield (max lbs/acre):  1800-2200 per USDA Cultivar description,or 2100-2500 per Hop Growers of America/USAHops
  • Alpha Acids:  3.5-4.5% 
  • Beta Acids:  4.5-6.7%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  20-26%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce):  0.8-2.1 ml
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  50%
  • Disease Resistance:  Resistant to downey mildew.  Resistant to verticillum wilt.
  • Harvest maturity:  Medium-late to late
  • Comparables:  Mt. Hood, Hersbrucker, Liberty, Hallertau
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes:  24”-36” sidearms.  Grows well with good color, large bines are smoother than most American types. Responds well to more acidic soils with humic acids. Shows good resistance to mildews and pests. Good cone size & pick-ability /plant habit. Easier to grow than most other Hallertauer hybrids. Raised row recommended. 36”- 42” in-row spacing. Over drying cones at high temps can quickly destroy the aroma profile; leaving only hard resins with garlic/onion notes. 
  • Recommended Resources:  USDA Cultivar Description, Beer Legends Profile

Galena

Galena was developed in Idaho in 1978 through the open pollination of Brewers' Gold.  It produces a clean, crisp bittering effect and is one of the more beloved bittering varieties.  

  • Aromas:  Citrus, lime, gooseberry, brandy, pear, pineapple, spicy
  • Used In:  IPAs, stouts, pale ales, brown ales
  • Yield (max lbs/acre):  1600-2000
  • Alpha Acids:  11.5%-13.5%
  • Beta Acids:  7.0-8.7%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  36-40%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce):  0.9-1.3 ml
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  75-85%
  • Disease Resistance:  Moderately resistant to downey mildew, resistant to verticillium wilt.  Susceptible to powdery mildew.
  • Harvest maturity:  Early to mid-season
  • Comparables:  Newport, Nugget, CTZ (Columbus, Tomahawk & Zeus), Chinook
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes:  A large, robust hop with large bines and 20”-40” side arms. Good resistance to mildews and pests in our Midwest trials.  A superior “workhorse” bittering type hop that few other hop varieties can keep up with.  A large, robust hop with large bines and 20”-40” side arms. Good resistance to mildews and pests . . . Great plant structure with large bines and excellent cone production. Can easily see why it is a popular choice for commercial growers out West. An all around “workhorse”. Have not seen mildew problem spoken of in our Michigan trials. 42” in-row spacing. 
  • Recommended Resources:  USDA Cultivar Profile, Beer Legends Profile

Glacier

A balanced dual purpose hop released by Washington State University in 2000, Glacier is loved by growers for its impressive yields and by brewers for its versatility as a reliable bittering agent and as an aromatic for numerous styles, including pale ales. 

  • Aromas:  Citrus and fruit notes, herb and wood aromas
  • Used In:  American & English ales, including IPA and pale ales, wheat beers, stouts and porters
  • Yield (max lbs/acre):   2400-2600
  • Alpha Acids:  3.3-9.7%
  • Beta Acids:  5.4-9.7%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  11-13%  
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce):    0.7-1.3
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  70-75%
  • Disease Resistance:  Moderate susceptibility to downey and powdery mildew
  • Seasonal Harvest: Mid-season
  • Comparables/substitutions:  Willamette, Fuggle, Tettnanger, Styrian Golding
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes:  18”-30” sidearms.  Good newer “French”variety that grows similar to Crystal. Smaller dense cones that are sticky with soft resins. Alphas are boosted compared to French Elasser. Plant responds well to additional humic acid and bone meal fertilization in our Michigan trials. Tolerates heavier type soils if pH range is correct and is not over-watered. Raised row required unless grown in sandy soil types. 36” in- row spacing.
  • Recommended Resources:  Beer Legends Profile

Horizon

Horizon is a sister to Nugget and boasts both high alphas and oils as well as the lowest cohumulone content of any commercially available hop.  It is a dual purpose variety that is currently on the rise among craft brewers.  

  • Aromas:  Floral, spicy
  • Used In:   American ales, lagers
  • Yield(max lbs/acre):  1800-2000
  • Alpha Acids:  11.0-13.0%
  • Beta Acids:  6.5-8.5%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  16-19%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce):  .5-2.0 ml
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  68-89%
  • Disease Resistance:  Moderately susceptible to downey mildew but moderately resistant to verticillium wilt.  
  • Seasonal harvest:  Mid to late
  • Comparables:  Magnum, Nugget (though not as close as one would expect from siblings)
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes:   15-30”side arms. . . . One of the best new high alpha /aroma varieties in trials so far; grows and climbs well, with a better crown structure than Nugget. Plant habit is notably different than most hops – with smaller, fuzzier leaves and shorter internodes. These traits create a dense foliage that can harbor mites and powdery mildew. A candidate for short trellis if spaced properly. Raised row recommend. Prefers more acidic soils. 30”- 36”in-row spacing. 
  • Recommended Resources:  USDA Cultivar Description, Beer Legends Profile

Magnum (or Hallertaur Magnum)

Both the U.S. version ('Magnum') and its German predecessor/counterpart ('Hallertauer Magnum') are primarily employed as bittering agents due to their high alpha acid content and very low aroma.  Very popular among brewers for a clean, non-harsh bittering effect. 

  • Aromas:  Very mild, pine, resin 
  • Used In:  IPAs, pale ales, stouts
  • Yield (max lbs/acre):  1800-2000
  • Alpha Acids:  12.0-14%
  • Beta Acids:  4.5-6.0%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  24-28%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce): 1.9-2.3%
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  90%
  • Disease Resistance:  Resistant to moderately resistant to downey mildew.  Resistant to verticillium wilt.  Moderately susceptible to powdery mildew.
  • Seasonal harvest:  Mid to mid-late
  • Comparables:  Hallertauer Taurus, Colombus, Nugget (though none are truly analagous)
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes:  24”-36”sidearms. . . .Comes out of the ground well with large primary bines and is easy to train. Some resistance to mildews and pests. A large variety that is only slightly less vigorous than Galena. Takes two seasons to establish. Prefers acidic, well-drained soils that are high in humic acids. Raised row recommended. Shows some resistance to mildews and pests. 38-42” in-row spacing.   
  • Recommended Resources:  USDA Cultivar Description, Beer Legends Profile

Newport

According to the USDA Agriculture Research Service, Newport is the only bittering hop that has a high level of genetic resistance to both mildew strains. This new variety, introduced in 2002, produces large yields and is considered "grower friendly." One major brewery is conducting large-scale pilot brewing trials and commercial use appears to be growing.  

  • Aromas:  Mild, citrus, balsam
  • Used In: American ales, IPAs, barley wines
  • Yield (max lbs/acre):  1800-2200
  • Alpha Acids:  13.5-17.0%
  • Beta Acids:  7.2%-9.1%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils): 36-38%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce:)  1.6-3.4%
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  60%
  • Disease Resistance:  Moderately resistant to downey mildew and verticillium wilt.
  • Harvest Maturity:  Mid-late
  • Comparables:  Nugget, Galena, Fuggle, Brewer's Gold
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes:   18”-36”sidearms. . . .Beefy crowns with good primary bines and plant habit, climbs well, has higher aroma/ flavor ratio than Nugget. Good resistance to mildews and tolerates a wider range of soil conditions than most varieties. 36”-42” in-row spacing. 
  • Recommended Resources:  Beer Legends Profile

Northern Brewer

The U.S. version of Northern Brewer hops is a closely related descendant of the similarly named German variety. It is used widely by brewers in a dual purpose role, and is well known as a signature of the Anchor Brewing Company's various ales.  While it is commercially desirable, especially for European styles and among Eastern U.S. craft brewers, yields are typically on the lower end of the spectrum.   

  • Aromas: Medium intensity, pine, mint
  • Used In:  IPAs, porters, hefeweizen
  • Yield (max lbs/acre):  800-1200
  • Alpha Acids:  13.5-17.0%
  • Beta Acids:  7.2-9.1%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  20-30%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce):  1.5-2.0 ml
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  Good to fair (USDA rating; percentage not reported)
  • Disease Resistance:  Moderately resistant to downey mildew.  Resistant to verticillium wilt.
  • Harvest Maturity:  Early
  • Comparables:  Chinook
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes:  Has 12- 20” short side arms.  An oft overlooked variety that reportedly grows well in sandy sites. Also grown in Europe, shorter side arms pick well. Shows resistance to mildews. Short side arms make this a candidate for short trellis and/or higher density plantings. Brewers are rediscovering its uniqueness. Raised row recommended. Tight 28”-36”in-row spacing. 
  • Recommended Resources:  USDA Cultivar Description, Beer Legends Profile

Nugget

Released by the U.S.D.A. in 1982, Nugget was initially considered solely a bittering hop due to its high alpha content, but in the time since has been embraced by brewers for its strong aromatic characteristics as well.  One of the more widely grown and commercially marketable hops varieties in the U.S.   

  • Aromas:  Lime, ginger, pineapple, geranium, lychee
  • Used In:  IPAs, barley wines, ESBs, and stouts
  • Yield (max lbs/acre):  1800-2400
  • Alpha Acids:  8.0-10.0%
  • Beta Acids:  4.2-5.8%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  22-26%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce):  1.8-2.2 ml
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  Very good (USDA rating; percentage not reported)
  • Disease Resistance:  Resistant to downy mildew and verticillium wilt.  
  • Harvest Maturity:  Medium late to late
  • Comparables:  Newport, Galena
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes:   Superior plant habit; 20-40” side arms. . . . Nugget is a great variety for picking, drying and baling. It has a cluster cone structure that is heavy, tight and moderately long. The lupulin from the Nugget is abundant with a yellow-orange color. Superior plant habit; 20-40” side arms. . . . In the top ten varieties for vigor and yield with large primary bines. Crown buds tend to form high on this variety and buds are more exposed to winter desiccation if not covered in areas with inadequate snow cover. If plants are cut too close to the ground in the spring “blind” plants with no crown buds are common and are slow to recover. Mulch or soil cover is recommended to protect high buds over the winter. Shows some resistance to mildews. Prefers more acidic soil types & humic acid. 36”- 42” in-row spacing.
  • Recommended Resources:  USDA Cultivar Description, Beer Legends Profile

Saaz (US)

Bred from seedlings of the renowned, centuries-old Czech Saaz variety, the United States version of Saaz carries the same noble qualities but with some subtle differences. Its flavor and aroma profile is mild with a distinct peppery flavor (due to a high farnesene levels), and its alpha is slightly higher than its Czech twin.  Saaz (US) is widely used in Lagers and Pilsners by brewers of all stripes, and indeed is generally considered one of the finer of the 'noble' varieties.

  • Aromas:  Mild, spicy with a hint of pepper, earthen
  • Used In:  Lagers, pilseners, wheat beers, Bohemian beers
  • Yield (max lbs/acre):  1000
  • Alpha Acids: 3-4%
  • Beta Acids: 3-4% 
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  24-28%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce): .5-1.0 ml
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F: 45-50%
  • Harvest Maturity:  Early
  • Comparables:  Sterling, Lublin (Poland)
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes:  "The quickest hop to break winter dormancy; thus susceptible to freeze back and loss of crown buds- needs protective mulching. Smaller crowns with lower vigor; similar to other noble types.. Seems to grow better in areas with more moderate winters. Responds to additional bone-meal and a balanced calcium/phosphate ratio. A candidate for short trellis and/or high density hop yards. Shows resistance to mildews. Does not tolerate wet, soggy soil conditions. Raised row required. Saaz combines very well with Crystal and Magnum. Takes two years to establish. 28”- 36” in-row spacing.  6”-24” sidearms. Can be grown high density, possible short trellis."
  • Disease Resistance:  Moderate resistance to mildews. 
  • Recommended Resources:  MSU IPM Grower Notes, Beer Legends Profile, Hopslist

Sorachi Ace

A Japanese bittering variety developed for Sapporo Breweries and best known as the signature element in Sapporo Lager, Sorachi Ace is increasingly being used by craft brewers in conjunction with aromatic varieties for IPAs and similar beers.  Also a good choice for single hop beer styles.

  • Aromas:  Citrus, dill
  • Used In:  Lagers, pale ales, farmhouse ales, IPAs
  • Yield/acre:  Fair to good (USDA rating, detail unknown)
  • Alpha Acids:  12.0-13.0%
  • Beta Acids:  8.8-9.9%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  23-27%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce):  2.8-3.2 ml
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  No information available.
  • Disease Resistance:  Resistant to downey mildew.
  • Harvest Maturity:  Mid-season
  • Comparables:  Citra, Simcoe 
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes:  12- 36” sidearms with some resistance to disease and pests. . . .Has to be oasted and stored carefully or off-buttery flavor can develop.
  • Recommended Resources:  USDA Cultivar Description

Sterling

Commercially released in 1998, Sterling hops are a popular dual-purpose variety comprising 1/2 Saaz mixed with Cascade, Brewer's Gold, and several other strains.  It is sometimes equated with the Noble varieties, but boasts a citrus aroma that distinguishes it from its Saaz parentage.  

  • Aromas:   Herbal, spicy, hint of floral, citrus
  • Used In:  American ales, Belgian Ales, Czech lagers and pilseners
  • Yield (max lbs/acre):  1800-2000
  • Alpha Acids: 6.0-9.0%
  • Beta Acids:  4.0-6.0%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  22-28%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce):  1.3-1.9 ml
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  Fair to good (USDA rating; percentage not reported)
  • Disease Resistance:  Moderately resistant to downy and powdery mildew.
  • Harvest maturity:  Mid-season
  • Comparables:  Saaz, Mt. Hood
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes:  24-36” side arms.  The first to enter dormancy, intolerant about wet soils. Reportedly tough to grow in Northern Michigan, but grows well in the Southwest. Seem to do well in more southern climes with mild winters and drier soils. Susceptible to mildews and viruses. Takes two years to establish. Did not perform as well as Saaz (US) in our Michigan trials. 36”in-row spacing. 
  • Recommended Resources:  USDA Cultivar Description, Beer Legends Profile

Styrian Golding

Also known as Savinja Golding, this variety actually has no relation to the 'Golding' strain and is in fact a descendant of Fuggle.  Styrian Golding has a strong history, and once served as the primary Austrian hop due to its resistance to powdery mildew during an epidemic that affected other Austrian varieties in the 1930s.  It is an aroma variety with low alpha content and is well regarded by brewers worldwide for a variety of beer styles. 

  • Aromas:  Spicy, earthy, white pepper
  • Used In:  Ales (summer, spring, English), pale ales, ESBs.
  • Yield (max lbs/acre):  1150-1500
  • Alpha Acids:  4.5-6.0%
  • Beta Acids:  2-3%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  25-30%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce):  .5-1 ml
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  65-80%
  • Disease Resistance:  Resistant to downy mildew.  Moderately susceptible to verticilium wilt.
  • Harvest Maturity:  Early
  • Comparables:  Fuggle, Willamette
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes:   NONE.  Other sources report vigorous growth early in the season, slowing late.  Generally in the 'moderate vigor' category.
  • Recommended Resources:  USDA Cultivar Description, Beer Legends Profile

Teamaker

Teamaker is a highly aromatic hop introduced by the USDA Agricultural Research Service in 2008.  It offers the lowest alpha acids content of any commercially available variety while boasting strong beta acid levels.  Recent research suggests that beta acids have anti-microbial properties, and are therefore in demand for potential uses ranging from animal antibiotics to replacement of formalin in sugar processing.  Thus, Teamaker's high betas and low alphas makes it a popular choice for use in teas and other non-beer applications for those seeking to take advantage of the health benefits of hops without the characteristic bitter taste.  For brewers, Teamaker offers a purely aromatic effect for applications where bittering is offered through other ingredients.  

  • Aromas:  Earthy, grassy, floral
  • Used In: Tea, blonde ale, light ale, pale ale
  • Yield (max lbs/acre):  Not available
  • Alpha Acids: .6-1.8%
  • Beta Acids:  5.4-13.2%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  Not available
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce):  Not available
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  'Good' (per MSU IPM Program; no percentage reported)
  • Harvest Maturity:  Mid-season
  • Comparables:  Crystal?
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes:   24”-36” sidearms.  Vigorous plant with good yields and habit. Some resistance to mildews and crown rots. Rare high aroma type – probably the strongest aroma picked wet. Grows very well in our Michigan trials. 36”-42” spacing.
  • Disease Resistance:  Not available

Tettnanger (U.S.)

Tettnanger (or "Tettnang") is a noble hop with a spicy floral aroma related closely to the German/Swiss varieties of the same name.  While there are some interesting geneology questions--the USDA cultivar profile describes U.S. Tettnanger as of "uncertain" origin, and states that: "this hop supposedly came from the heat treated USDA 61021 (Swiss Tettnanger) from Prosser, WA but may have become mixed with Fuggle"--what is clear is that this is a popular dual-purpose variety with close similarity to Saaz in its brewing profile.  

  • Aromas:  Mild, floral, spicy
  • Used In: German ales and lagers, American ales, wheat beers
  • Yield (max lbs/acre): 1000-1400
  • Alpha Acids: 4-5%
  • Beta Acids: 3-4.5%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  20-25%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce):  .4-.8 ml
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  70%
  • Harvest Maturity:  Early
  • Comparables:  Ultra, Saaz, German Tettnanger, Spalter Select
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes:  "An older commercial variety that grows well in our Michigan trials, reportedly varies year-to-year in yields. Shows resistance to mildews, but does poorly in overly wet soils. Establishes more quickly than most noble types. 30-36” in-row spacing.  Trellis types: 12’x 42’ even or clustered. 12’ hedgerow. . . .12"-36" sidearms."
  • Disease Resistance:  Resistant to downy mildew.  

Triple Pearl

Triple Pearl was introduced in 2013 by the USDA Agricultural Research Service and as a newer variety is still in its infancy as a commercial variety.  It is regarded as similar to Perle (and indeed is an open-pollinated triploid daughter of Perle) but with a stronger aroma profile.  It is a dual purpose variety that presents strong bittering potential given its high alpa acid content, but which has won early favor primarily for its distinct and balanced aromas.   

  • Aromas:  Orange-citrus, orange rind/zest, melon, resin, spicy, slightly pepper
  • Used In:  Pale ales, IPAs
  • Yield/acre:  Not available
  • Alpha Acids:  10.2-11.2%
  • Beta Acids:  3.3-4.2%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  22-25%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce):  1.1-1.8 ml
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  Not available
  • Comparables:  Perle
  • Disease Resistance: Not available

Ultra

A slightly flowery aroma hop low in alpha acids and usable for subtle bittering and aroma in a broad range of lagers, pilseners and similar beers.  Similar in many respects to the Noble varieties.  

  • Aromas:  Floral with spice
  • Used In:  Pilseners, wheat beers, bocks
  • Yield (max lbs/acre):  1800-2200
  • Alpha Acids: 3-5%
  • Beta Acids: 4-5%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  25-30%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce): 1.3-1.5
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  
  • Disease Resistance: Bred for resistance to downy mildew and verticillium wilt
  • Harvest Maturity:  Medium to late
  • Comparables:  Tettnanger, Saaz, Hallertauer
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes: "Reports of good yields in northern growing areas. Aroma/oil profile is very similar to Hallertauer mittlefrueh and is in demand with craft brewers. . . . Ultra has been one of the slowest hops to establish. It demands excellent drainage and soil conditions. Responds to an acidic soil with bone meal added. Low resistance to mildews if improperly sited and over-fertilized/watered. A challenging hop to grow well, but if successful can sell it all day long at premium prices. 36” in-row spacing."
  • Recommended Resources:  Beer Legends Profile, USDA Cultivar Description

Vanguard

A slightly flowery aroma hop low in alpha acids and usable for subtle bittering and aroma in a broad range of lagers, pilseners and similar beers.  Similar in many respects to the Noble varieties.  

  • Aromas:  Mild, pleasant, similar to Hallertau MittelFreuh
  • Used In:  Belgian ales, lagers, pilseners and similar
  • Yield (max lbs/acre):  1300-1700
  • Alpha Acids:  5.5-6.0%
  • Beta Acids:  6.0-7.0%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  14-16%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce):  .9-1.2
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  Not available
  • Disease Resistance: Not available
  • Harvest Maturity:  Medium to late
  • Comparables: Liberty, Mt. Hood, Hallertau, Hersbrucker
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes:  15-30” sidearms with good vigor.  Shows notably better vigor than most Hallertauer cultivars. Has some resistance to mildews but doesn’t tolerate wet heavy soil types. 36” in-row spacing. 
  • Recommended Resources:  Beer Legends Profile

Willamette

Named for the river that drains Oregon hop country, Willamette was released by the USDA in 1976 and is now one of the primary commercial hops, accounting for close to 20% of total U.S. hops acreage.  A daughter of Fuggle, it's an aroma hop with mild, pleasant aroma and relatively low alpha content.  It is extremely popular in the craft segment.  

  • Aromas:  Citrus, floral, caramel, curry, elderberry
  • Used In:  Almost every beer category
  • Yield (max lbs/acre):  1700-2200 (per USDA cultivar index)
  • Alpha Acids: 6.6%
  • Beta Acids: 3.8%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  29-35%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce):  .8-1.2
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:
  • Harvest Maturity:  Early to mid
  • Comparables:  Fuggle, Tettnanger, Styrian Golding
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes:  "It has a vigorous growth habit with longer 24-40” sidearms. The round cone structure is small to medium in size. It also has a moderate amount of lupulin that is golden yellow in color. A quality aroma/ flavoring “workhorse”hop is the general perception of the Willamette. . . . Crown buds form relatively high, so they need winter protection by hilling the rows in fall or mulching. Of the Fuggle types, Willamette is the slowest to break winter dormancy. Needs warm temperatures to really get going – does less than optimum in areas with lake effect cooling or if spaced too tightly or planted too closely. Tolerant of a wider range of pH and soil types than most hops. 42”in-row or cluster spacing."
  • Disease Resistance:  Resistant to downy mildew, moderate susceptibility to powdery and verticillium wilt
  • Recommended Resources:  Beer Legends profile, USDA Electronic Variety Manual, USDA Cultivar profile, MSU IPM Grower Notes

Yakima Gold

The fourth of four new cultivars released by the USDA in 2013 (along with Cashmere, Triple Pearl, and Tahoma), Yakima Gold descends from Cluster and a wild Slovenian male.  It is a dual purpose hop with strong American aromatics, as would be expected given its relation to Cluster.  However, Yakima Gold also offers significant farnesene, which evokes comparison with noble varieties like Saaz and Tettnanger.   

  • Aromas:  Grapefruit, lemon zest, lemongrass, slight spice
  • Used In: Pale ales, IPAs, mild ales
  • Yield (max lbs/acre):  No information available, though it is reported to be an extremely vigorous grower and high yields are anticipated.
  • Alpha Acids: 8.8-10.5%
  • Beta Acids: 4.3-5%
  • Cohumulone (as % of total oils):  21-23%
  • Total oils (ml/100g of produce):  1.9-2.3%
  • Oils remaining after 6 mos. storage at 68F:  Unknown
  • Harvest Maturity:  Unknown
  • Comparables:  Cluster, Saaz, Cascade
  • MSU IPM Grower Notes:  None.
  • Disease Resistance:  Unknown.  Rumored to be moderately resistant to downy mildew, but susceptible to powdery.
  • Recommended Resources:  HopslistBrooklyn Brewshop Profile